Tag Archives: Facebook

Would a digitized rose smell as sweet?

10 May

It’s the end of paper… I’m not sure if I care.

Wedding invitation supplies

Photo credit to y-a-n.

The other day I got a wedding invitation… via Facebook message.  My reactions, in this order, were:

  1. Friend 1 and Friend 2 are getting married!
  2. They like me enough to invite me?!
  3. A wedding invitation via Facebook message – that’s just wrong.
  4. Of course they sent the invitation via Facebook, it’s the only way that they have of getting in touch with me.

For the vast majority of people in my life, Facebook is the only way that I have of getting a hold of them, and vice versa.  I don’t keep Outlook or Google contacts; I definitely don’t have a phone book.  My phone is synced to Facebook, so it automatically grabs my friend’s numbers and e-mail addresses.  Directly or indirectly, my knowledge of how to get in touch with people stems from our Facebook connections. Continue reading

You have the like to remain silent

8 May

Anything you like can and will be used against you in a court of law

Image

Yes, this is a very dramatic picture for a post about Facebook, but I never get to use the pictures that I took at Williamsburg.

Four score and seven days ago… was the last time I updated my blog.  Okay, so it was probably more like ten score and seven days ago, but that’s not nearly as auspicious an opening line.  And auspicious opening lines do relate to the subject at hand: freedom of speech, more specifically if a like constitutes speech.  So really, freedom of likes.

The New York Times is reporting that, in a case that’s sure to go up on appeal (seriously, anyone want to bet on this?) a judge found that:

“Simply liking a Facebook page is insufficient.  It is not the kind of substantive statement that has previously warranted constitutional protection … For the Court to assume that the Plaintiffs made some specific statement without evidence of such statements is improper.”

Here’s my question: since when does speech need to be substantive to be protected?  I say insubstantial things all the time…  bippity boppity boo, see?  So, what was the like that warranted such a hubbub?  A man was fired from his job at a sheriff’s department, the reason: creating discord in the office by liking the sheriff’s political opponent’s Facebook page.  Okay, probably not the most savvy thing to do, but not exactly the equivalent of yelling fire in a crowded theatre.  Continue reading

OpenGraph and Conformity

14 Oct

Or, Invasion of the Brain Snatchers

kid listening to headphones

Photo credit to vagawi

Recently, I read a post called “Is it time for an anonymity movement to challenge Facebook?”  Although the (very great) points of the post ranged far and wide, the part that stuck with me was this section about Facebook and conformity:

But having the ambition to display the whole life of their users is just insane.  Take Spotify, for example!  Sharing the music you’re listening to seems great, right?  Just put yourself in the shoes of a shy 16-year-old guy; what is he going to do to impress others and fit in?   He’s going to listen to the same music that everyone else is listening to, so as not to seem “weird” at all via his very public Facebook profile.

Imagine that he may stop listening to what he really likes because he will be ashamed to share his real taste in music, unless he is one of the rare users that figures out how to stop the feed from Spotify to Facebook.

Now take this concept and duplicate it for tastes in TV, movies, places to eat … maybe with just about everything.

Facebook is on track to homogenize society, which conversely, and ironically, may “weaken” the database that Facebook is building and the advertising targeting that they are offering! Continue reading

Frictionless sharing and the end of Social Media Curation

2 Oct
Sharing by talkingplant

Photo credit to talkingplant

In my last post, I discussed how frictionless sharing without context was meaningless.  How an app posting that “Maggie read this” really only meant “Someone on Maggie’s computer clicked on this”.

But frictionless sharing means a lot more than meaningless oversharing, it’s also the end of social media curation.

Since the rise of social media, we’ve all become curators – we’ve become the scrapbookers and librarians of our own lives, learning to research, present, and display material in a meaningful and engaging way.  Continue reading

Would you pay $5.55 to own your Facebook?

28 Sep

Or, how do you put a value on love, I mean, Facebook?

Money by Thomas Hawks

Photo credit to Thomas Hawks

I’ve been following (and participating in) the discussions of the Facebook changes announced at f8 (for more on that, see my previous post), and have been feeling that the Facebook changes are more directed at supporting further funding sources for Facebook than they are about improving user experiences.  (Facebook seems to take the bread and circuses approach to keeping people happy – the pretty new timeline/cover aesthetic is the newest circus.)

The Guardian’s article “Why Facebook’s new Open Graph makes us all part of the web underclass” was the first piece that I’ve seen that really took the issues that I’ve been grappling with and fleshed them out. Continue reading

Old Facebook Posts Don’t Die, They Just Fade Away

26 Sep

Or, I’ve seen the future of Facebook and it’s beautiful… and scary

Facebook Protest, Red Fist above Facebook Logo

Get ready for all kinds of anti-Facebook Facebook groups. And no, the members don't get the irony. Don't both pointing it out.

This week, we have a new Facebook.  Small changes have been rolled out to the public already (about which there has been much whining and fake petitioning), but the big ones are yet to come.  Speaking at the F8 Facebook developer conference, Mark Zuckerberg announced the implementation of the open graph and the shift from profiles to timelines.  Although the open graph (which will bring your actions across the Internet into Facebook) will arguably have a much bigger impact on real issues, like privacy concerns and the further monetization of your social actions, I expect all the yelling to be about timelines.  (Yes, there will be yelling – there’s always yelling with Facebook changes.)

So, I decided that I wanted to experience timelines for myself, before all the yelling started.  Thanks to what I learned from an article on TechCrunch, I was able to convince Facebook that I was an app developer and that I needed access to timeline to see how my app would play in the new timeline/open graph environment.  (Don’t worry, I crossed my fingers while I did it, so it’s not really a lie, right?) Continue reading

Ugly Ducklings and Social Media Success

16 Sep

Or, I’m really good at Facebook.

Swan DucklingsRecently, a lot of people have been asking me to explain Klout.  What is it?  Why does it give me free stuff?  And, I’m left to say, “I’m really good at Facebook.”  There’s no better explanation, and it’s true.  I’ve figured it out.  I know how to get comments and likes.  I know which types of content will engage my friends.  It sounds terrible to admit that it’s as calculated as that, but it is.  And here’s the secret: everyone that works in digital strategy or social media marketing does the same thing.  We all use our personal accounts as a way of testing follower growth and engagement strategies.  (Will following Crowdbooser’s suggestions improve my retweet rate?  Will Twellow’s directory help me to get targeted followers?  How far can I push mass follow/unfollow efforts without getting delisted?) Continue reading

My Social Media Vacation

4 Sep

A failed, or not, experiment

Cousins at CampThis weekend, I took a vacation from social media.  Over Labor Day weekend, my family resumed a long-standing tradition to attend family camp with our cousins.  It’s the kind of place where you’re perpetually dirty and the big event of the day is a game of ultimate Frisbee.  Where you actually sit and talk with your grandparents about what it was like when they were kids and interact with your parents like they’re your friends.  It’s great.

And it’s been great since I was a kid.  Since before there was social media.  Since before Facebook had even been thought of.  (Although I’m sure that, if pressed in a law suit, Mark Zuckerburg would say that he had been tinkering with the idea even back then.)  So, I figured that if I had loved camp without social media then, I would love camp without social media now.  I took getting away for the weekend as an opportunity to unplug for the weekend, too.  (Of course, I still brought my laptop, because I can’t unplug completely.  It’s my hard and clunky security blanket.) Continue reading

I’ve got more Klout than Congress

31 Aug

Klout logo, Klout, the measure of social media influenceOr, did you know that you’re in the (online) presence of greatness?

Now, before we get any further, I’m just going to head this off at the pass, predicting e-mails and comments that I’m sure to receive:

“Maggie, that was a really great blog post, but you spelled clout wrong , it’s clout with a C, not klout with a K . You might want to go back and fix it.”

Actually, for once in my life, I didn’t spell something wrong. (Shocking.) Klout with a K is a proper noun, it’s a system that measures your social media influence . As Klout’s website puts it:

“Our friendships and professional connections have moved online, making influence measurable for the first time in history. When you recommend, share, and create content you impact others. Your Klout Score measures that influence on a scale of 1 to 100.”

Mean GirlsSo, basically, it’s a an internet popularity contest, a measure of your social capital and personal brand. The higher your Klout score, the higher your social media influence. Klout uses gamification to draw you in and even gives you free stuff… so, it’s completely addicting. Getting free things because people like my Facebook status? Turning my social capital into real capital? Yes please! (Of course, the things you get are from paid advertisers who want you to use your social media influence to increase their social media influence…) Continue reading

The Six Degrees of Kevin Facebook

22 Aug
Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon - Way to own your own meme

Way to own your own meme, Kevin Bacon!

Or, Watch Maggie geek out about Facebook and math at the same time

Yesterday, I woke up to find that The Social Times had an article called “The ‘Small World Experiment’: Yahoo and Facebook Help Research Six Degrees of Separation”.  Then I listened to “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me” – and it was the one where they interviewed Kevin Bacon.  He talked all about the game and how originally he had thought it was people making fun of him, i.e. this guy has been in so many movies and he still sucks.  Kevin Bacon’s personal insecurities aside, I took it as a sign that I should write a blog post about the Six Degrees research. Continue reading

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